Syria Sets Example for Merger of Russian Opposition and Islamists

Posted: August 26, 2012 in Uncategorized
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Recent reports of members of the Russian opposition flirting with nationalists and radical Islamists tend to confuse our readers. What game is this? Trivially indiscriminate associations, or a carefully calculated move to bring together different factions in an attempt to overthrow the “regime”? Perhaps an act of desperation? Let us consider Syria as an example where the merger of opposition and Islamists is rapidly taking place.

It is no longer a secret that Al Qaeda and other radical Islamic gangs are fighting against Assad. It is also no secret that the “freedom fighters” are not a homogenous group but rather a patchwork mob made up of groups supporting different interests. The most renown is the so-called “Free Syrian Army” (FSA), which, while being sponsored by the West, is forced to act under the guise of fighting for democracy and protection of human rights in order to maintain this image in the eyes of Western voters.

But the trouble is, the worse things are for the FSA, the stronger the pressure from Assad’s forces, the more of its members stop their democratic masquerade and join ranks with the Islamists. And there are good reasons for this. Firstly, the radicals’ ideals are much clearer to the rebels than alien European slogans. Secondly, Islamists enjoy strong financial support from Wahhabi sponsors around the world. Thirdly, it is widely known that Islamist militants get regular troop support from Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, Yemen and other countries. Incidentally, this largely explains the confusion with military victories of the government forces. Every other day we receive reports of the Syrian Army freeing yet another area of ​​Aleppo from militant forces, only to have it re-taken by a new rebel regiment within a matter of days. The stream of people looking to join ranks with the radicals does not dry out, which certainly enhances their credibility within the FSA. In other words, the West, which has been unable to help the rebels win the war over the last one and a half years, is rapidly losing out to Islamist assurances of their firm intent to build a Wahhabi emirate in Syria.

Today one of the Syrian insurgent groups known as Al-Kaakaa broke away from the FSA and its slogans of democracy to join the Dzhabhat en-Nusra Islamist group, giving a bayat (oath of allegiance) to its Emir.

Dzhabhat en-Nusra is a Syrian Wahhabi organization known for its bold terrorist attacks and other ruthless crimes. One of its most recent public actions was the execution of 13 government soldiers, which the group had taken prisoner earlier. The militants thusly commented their grisly deed:

“Indeed, this act of vengeance is not to be separated from the one before it, and we wish for its continuation, so that we would kill and shed their blood (just as they have shed our blood), and that they and their patrons know that, Allah permitting, they will face agonizing death, a terrible end (in this life), and a terrible fate on Judgment Day!”

We would like to remind readers that just a little earlier one of the insurgent Aleppo commanders warned the US:

“We do not want al-Qaeda here, but if no one will help us, we will join them. We want them [the Western countries] to give us weapons for protection, or to carry out a military intervention. We are angry. Syrian people still like European countries, but if they continue in the same spirit, they will know only hate.”

By the way, the aforementioned Syrian Dzhabhat en-Nusra enjoys great prestige and honors from the Russian Wahhabis, which have sharply intensified their activity in the republics of the North Caucasus and the Volga region.

Rumors continue to circulate that Russian citizens participate in the war against Assad. Thus recently Rustam Gelayev, son of the Chechen militant Ruslan Gelayev, who was destroyed by Russian border police in 2004, was killed in Syria. On the other hand, Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov denied Chechen involvement in the Syrian conflict, calling “Gelayev, Basayev and others” men without a homeland.

But lets turn back to the Russian “democratic opposition.” Note that its leaders made some demonstrative steps towards the Tatarstan separatists after passing of the new law on Foreign Agents, tougher penalties for rallies, and public allegations of links with the U.S. State Department. We doubt such actions by the opposition aim to intimidate their overseas sponsors, rather it looks like they are trying to blackmail the Russian government by threatening to merge in ecstasy with the separatists and the Wahhabis. On the other hand, perhaps they are just looking for some new faces to join their “march of millions.”

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